Dispute resolution

UK Litigation Brief | October 2022

Published on 19th Oct 2022

Welcome to the latest edition of Osborne Clarke's Litigation Brief

How are rising interest rates impacting claims?

As interest rates in the UK start to climb, parties are increasingly focused on the amount of interest that they can claim in relation to their litigation cases.

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How to get termination right

When things start to go wrong in a contractual relationship, either side might want to think about terminating early. Two recent cases have examined whether parties correctly exercised their contractual termination rights.

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The need for information to help your claim

The English civil procedure rules provide some assistance where you need to obtain information from a third party to help you pursue your claim. However, the situation becomes more complicated where that third party is situated overseas.

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Litigating across Europe

Lawyers across the Osborne Clarke network recently contributed to an article looking at timing issues for claims brought in their respective countries. Timing can be an important consideration when faced with a choice of jurisdictions in which to issue legal proceedings. Our article compares topics such as limitation periods, when time starts running, how long it takes to get to trial and how long appeals generally take to be heard.

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The Greener Litigation Pledge

Osborne Clarke's Disputes and Risk team has recently signed up to the up to the Greener Litigation Pledge. Established in June 2021, the Greener Litigation Pledge aims to change the way in which dispute resolution practitioners conduct litigation, by reducing the carbon footprint of court disputes in line with the objective of restricting global warming to 1.5°C as set out in the 2015 Paris Agreement.

Read more about how we are working to halve our emissions by 2030.

 

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* This article is current as of the date of its publication and does not necessarily reflect the present state of the law or relevant regulation.

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