News

Scam communications and Osborne Clarke


Written on 10 July 2018

Like other professional service firms, from time to time Osborne Clarke’s name (or the names of its solicitors) are used by fraudsters in scam emails, letters and faxes to add credibility to the fraudulent communication.

While we cannot police such scams, this page highlights those scams which have been brought to our attention and which we consider may pose a risk to other potential victims.

Osborne Clarke will never issue unsolicited communications suggesting that the recipient may be in a position to benefit from an inheritance from a named estate (e.g. “the estate of John Smith”). If you receive such a communication please treat it as a scam.

If you receive a communication bearing the name “Osborne Clarke Law Corp”, “Osborne Clarke Solicitors”, “Osborne Clarke & Partners UK”, “Osborn Clarke”, or from any email address other than osborneclarke.com it is also likely to be fraudulent.

If you have received a communication purportedly from this firm and you are unsure of its authenticity, please do contact our press office.

You can find more information on fraud including scam emails and how to report them on the Actionfraud website here.

Please note that communications intended for Osborne Clarke, that are mistakenly sent to an email domain other than “@osborneclarke.com” could
be received by third parties, not associated with Osborne Clarke. When sending information to Osborne Clarke, please ensure that emails are addressed to the correct recipients.

Specific fraudulent communications of which we are aware: 

None of the following matters are originated by Osborne Clarke. If you have received a communication resembling the ones detailed above we advise you to ignore it and do not contact the sender.

  • Updated 10 July 2018: Emails referencing “important documents” and asking you to log in to ShareFile with a valid email and email password to view the file. The email purports to be from “Osborne Clarke Solicitors” and is sent from multiple domain names – here’s an example:
  • Updated 13 March 2018: An email referencing a deceased relative who died in an ‘auto accident’ and has left an inheritance (with the recipient of the email said to be a ‘devisee’). The email purports to have been sent by Mr Kevin Barrow and asks that the recipient ‘affirm’ receipt.
  • Updated 8 November 2016: An email from mswesker.osborneclarke@groupmail.com purporting to be from Mark Wesker. This scam appears to involve the request of information, including financial information, from entities based in Europe and North America.
  • Updated 16 May 2016 : An email from osborneclarkeandpastnersuk@gmail.com purporting to be from Barrister Madeleine Clarke (QC.). This scam appears to be based in South Africa and involves the will of a deceased person with the same surname as the recipient.
  • Updated 15 October 2015: an email regarding a transaction in which the sender requests a deposit for a transaction that is in its final stages of negotiation. The sender refers to an Alexander Schofield, and proposes he will be in touch over the course of the day. You will then recieve an email purporting to be from Alexander, using the address alex.schofield@workmail.com.
  • Updated 2 April 2015 : An email from oclarkeandpartnersuk@outlook.com purporting to be from Barrister Madeleine Clarke (QC.). This scam appears to be based in South Africa and involves the will of a deceased person with the same surname as the recipient.
  • an email or letter referencing the will of a Ms. Gina or Ms. Tihana [surname will match recipient’s surname] (deceased). There might be other names that are being used that we are unaware of. The communication suggests that the recipient may be in a position to benefit from an inheritance if they purport to be a member of her extended family. This scam appears to originate from Valencia and is sent in the name of Sr. Osborne Clarke on behalf of Osborne Clarke Spain, the email address is osbornecl@lawyer.com.
  • an individual issuing fraudulent cheques using the name Paul Anning and purporting to work for ‘Osborne Clerke Chamber’. This scam appears to be based in the US and involves an individual commissioning work from companies and attempting to pay for it using fraudulent cheques.
  • an email or letter referencing the will of a Mr Jack McCulloch (deceased). The communication suggests that the recipient may be in a position to benefit from an inheritance if they marry his daughter.
  • a request for copy editing and proof reading support purporting to come from Tim Birt.
  • an email or letter referencing the wills of people with the same surname as the recipient. The sender is Mr. Osborne Clarke B.A.,Sc.,LLB,P.Eng. the email address being osborneclarkelaw1@gmail.com. The communication suggests that the recipient may be in a position to benefit from an inheritance.
  • an email regarding an inheritance from the Anderson family.  The sender is Mr Bill Baker of Osborne Clarke, the email address is osborneclarke@lawyer.com.  The communication requests personal information to enable them to benefit from an inheritance.